Defringe in Lightroom 4.1

Skill level
Beginner

Any photographer will tell you the pain that chromatic aberrations and color fringing can cause. While Lightroom 4 was a fantastic upgrade, it was missing extended support for color fringing. However, Lightroom 4.1 changes all that! Let’s take a look at how the new Defringing tool can help perfect your images!

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Why does chromatic aberration and color fringing occur?

Red-green and blue-yellow fringes at the image periphery result from lateral chromatic aberration. This problem is relatively easy to fix, and ACR & LR already have tools to do so. On the other hand, purple and green fringes in out-of-focus areas and along high-contrast boundaries are much more problematic. These fringes result from axial chromatic aberration (wavelength-dependent focus shift), aberrations in sensor microlenses, and flare. In most cases, purple fringes appear in front of the plane of focus, and green fringes appear behind the plane of focus. The aberrations can happen anywhere in the image, not just the image periphery. Sometimes, they are so strong that they’re easily spotted in small previews, such as proxies and thumbnails (thus, not only visible at 100% pixel view!). Axial CA affects nearly all lenses, from inexpensive cell phone lenses to very expensive top-of-the-line lenses. It is particularly pronounced with fast lenses at wide apertures. Hence, an improved defringe control should appeal to photographers shooting portraits, events, weddings, sports, etc. — anytime that high-speed lenses are used.” Source: Adobe Blog

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